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An Era of Extraordinary Vehicles: The U.S. Army's Experimental Overland Train

An Era of Extraordinary Vehicles: The U.S. Army's Experimental Overland Train
foto: Wikipedia/An Era of Extraordinary Vehicles: The U.S. Army's Experimental Overland Train
16 / 06 / 2023

When the U.S. Army had three experimental LCC-1 units developed in the 1950s, they probably didn't expect LeTourneau to come up with an overland train that would hold the record for the world's longest off-road vehicle for several decades. The longest of the three units measured 183 m and their creation was intended to break the dependence on local rail and road infrastructure to better cater to the logistical needs of the military.

Four gas turbines and 1,170 horsepower electric engines provided propulsion for the overland train to serve the U.S. Army primarily in Alaska. However, the four engines were not the main feature of the train, with one of them located in the driving car and the other three inside the train. The dominant feature was the more than three-meter wheels, which allowed the rig to keep the pressure low to the ground, and the LCC-1 could run on almost any surface, from dunes to snow drifts.

The train had the capacity of a crew of six, which could carry up to 150 tons of supplies and equipment. On flat ground, when fully loaded, the train could move at speeds of up to 20 miles per hour with a range usually between 350 and 400 miles. However, the range could be increased with the addition of extra trailers containing fuel.

The Alaskan overland train was used for over a decade, including the previous prototype (VC-12 Tournatrain). However, the need for ground vehicles to handle inhospitable conditions was diminishing with the advent of helicopters. Thus, the LCC-1s were retired, and to this day, some elements of the vehicles can still be found in American scrap yards.

Source: Youtube.com; Diseno Art

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